Rakefet Ackerman (Associate Professor)

Behavioral Science and Management

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Overview

Rakefet Ackerman is an Associate Professor of Cognitive Psychology at the Faculty of Industrial Engineering and Management, Technion, Israel. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Haifa, held a Post-Doctoral position at Ben-Gurion University, and she currently serves as the head of the Behavioral & Management Sciences area.
Prof. Ackerman studies learning, question answering, and problem solving. Her studies are based on the metacognitive approach, by which subjective assessment of knowledge guides the activities people perform for achieving their goals. Understanding the factors that affect the reliability of this subjective knowledge assessment and the cases that are particularly prone to biases offers a foundation for developing effective work environments and techniques. She takes part in establishing a new research domain, Meta-Reasoning, which deals with the metacognitive processes involved in reasoning and problem solving.
Prof. Ackerman's work has been published in leading journals, such as the Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Journal of Experimental Psychology (General; Learning, Memory, & Cognition; Applied), Cognition, and Computers in Human Behavior. She received grants from the German Israeli Foundation for Scientific Research and Development (GIF), Israel Foundation Trustees (IFT), and Israel Science Foundation (ISF) to study metacognitive processes. She is the Israel representative in the “Evolution of reading in the age of digitisation (E-READ)” European Cooperation (COST).
Before her graduate studies, Prof. Ackerman worked in the software development industry, as a product development manager and system analyst. She teaches Human Factors Engineering and Metacognition and is the head of the Laboratory of Behavioral Sciences. 

Selected Publications

Introduction to Metacognition in a Textbook:

Fiedler, K., Ackerman, R., & Scarampi, C. (2019). Metacognition: Monitoring and controlling one’s own knowledge, reasoning and decisions. In R. J. Sternberg & J. Funke (Eds.). Introduction to the Psychology of Human Thought (pp. 89-111). Heidelberg: Heidelberg University Publishing. [Self-made PDF]

Meta-Reasoning:

Ackerman, R., & Zalmanov, H. (2012). The persistence of the fluency-confidence association in problem solving. Psychonomic Bulleting & Review, 19(6), 1189-1192.[Self-made PDF][Journal's website]

Thompson, V., Prowse Turner, J., Pennycook, G., Ball, L., Brack, H., Ophir, Y., & Ackerman, R. (2013). The role of answer fluency and perceptual fluency as metacognitive cues for initiating analytic thinking. Cognition, 128, 237-251. [Self-made PDF][Journal's web site]

Thompson, V., Ackerman, R., Sidi, Y., Pennycook, G., Ball, L., & Prowse Turner, J. A. (2013). The role of answer fluency and perceptual fluency in the monitoring and control of reasoning: Reply to Alter, Oppenheimer, & Epley (2013). Cognition, 128, 256-258.

Ackerman, R. (2014). The Diminishing Criterion Model for metacognitive regulation of time investment. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143(3), 1349-1368. [Self-made PDF] [Journal's web site]

Ackerman, R. & Thompson, V. (2015). Meta-Reasoning: What can we learn from meta-memory. In A. Feeney & V. Thompson (Eds.), Reasoning as Memory (pp. 164-182). Hove, UK: Psychology Press. [Self-made PDF]

Meyer, A., Frederick, S., Burnham, T., Guevara Pinto, J. D., Boyer, T. W., Ball, L. J., Pennycook, G., Ackerman, R., Thompson, V., & Schuldt, J. P. (2015). Disfluent fonts don’t help people solve math problems. Journal of Experimental Psychology:    General,144(2), e16-e30. [Self-made PDF][Journal's website]

Sidi, Y., Ophir, Y., Ackerman, R. (2016). Generalizing Screen Inferiority - Does the Medium, Screen versus Paper, Affect Performance Even with Brief Tasks? Metacognition & Learning, 11(1), 15-33. [Self-made PDF] [Journal's web site]

Ackerman, R., & Beller, Y. (2017). Shared and distinct cue utilization for metacognitive judgments during reasoning and memorization. Thinking & Reasoning, 23:4, 376-408. [Self-made PDF] [Journal's web site]

Ackerman, R., & Thompson, V. (2017). Meta-Reasoning:  Monitoring and control of thinking and reasoning. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 21(8), 607-617. [Self-made PDF] [Journal's web site]

Ackerman, R. & Thompson, V. (2017). Meta-Reasoning: Shedding meta-cognitive light on reasoning research. L. Ball & V. Thompson (Eds.), The Routledge International Handbook of Thinking & Reasoning (pp.1-15). Psychology Press. [Self-made PDF]

Sidi, Y., Shpigelman, M., Zalmanov, H., & Ackerman, R. (2017). Understanding metacognitive inferiority on screen by exposing cues for depth of processing. Learning and Instruction, 51, 61-73. [Self-made PDF][Journal's web site]

Ackerman, R. (2019). Heuristic cues for meta-reasoning judgments: Review and methodology. Psychological Topics, 28(1), 1-20. [Open Access]

Morsanyi, K., Ní Cheallaigh, N., & Ackerman, R. (2019). Mathematics anxiety and metacognitive processes: Proposal for a new line of inquiry. Psychological Topics, 28(1), 147-169. [Open Access]

Dentakos, S., Saoud, W., Ackerman, R., & Toplak, M. E. (in press). Does Domain Matter? Monitoring Accuracy across Domains. Metacognition and Learning. [Self-made PDF]

Fiedler, K., Schott, M., Kareev, Y., Avrahami, J., Ackerman, R., Goldsmith, M., … Pantazi, M. (in press). Metacognitive myopia in change detection: A collective approach to overcome a persistent anomaly. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition. https://doi.org/10.1037/xlm0000751 [Journal's website]

Lauterman, T., & Ackerman, R. (in press). Initial Judgment of Solvability in non-verbal problems – A predictor of solving processes. Metacognition and Learning. [Self-made PDF] [Journal's shared version]

Metacognitive aspects of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI):

Ackerman, R., & Goldsmith, M. (2011). Metacognitive regulation of text learning: On screen versus on paper. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 17(1), 18-32.  [Self-made PDF][Conference proceeding][Short version in Hebrew]

Ackerman, R., & Lauterman, T. (2012). Taking reading comprehension exams on screen or on paper? A metacognitive analysis of learning texts under time pressure. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 1816-1828.[Self-made PDF][Journal's website]

Lauterman, T., & Ackerman, R. (2014).  Overcoming screen inferiority in learning and calibration. Computers in Human Behavior, 35, 455-463. [Self-made PDF][Journal's website]

Ackerman, R., Parush, A., Nassar, F., & Shtub, A. (2016). Metacognition and system usability: Incorporating metacognitive research paradigm into usability testing. Computers in Human Behavior, 54,101-113. [Self-made PDF]

Sidi, Y., Ophir, Y., Ackerman, R. (2016). see above, under Meta-Reasoning.

Sidi, Y., Shpigelman, M., Zalmanov, H., & Ackerman, R. (2017). see above, under Meta-Reasoning.

Delgado, P., Vargas, C., Ackerman, R., & Salmerón, L. (2018). Don't throw away your printed books: A meta-analysis on the effects of reading media on comprehension. Educational Research Review, 25, 23-38.[Self-made PDF] [Journal's website]

Wylie, J., Thomson, J., Leppänen, P., Ackerman, R., Kanniainen, L. & Prieler, T. (2018). Cognitive processes and digital reading. In M. Barzillai, J. Thomson, P. van den Broek & S. Schroeder (Eds). Learning to Read in a Digital World. (pp. 57-90). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. [Self-made PDF] [Publisher's web site]

Ackerman, R., Gal, A., Sagi, T., Shraga, R. (2019). A cognitive model of human bias in matching. In Pacific Rim International Conference on Artificial Intelligence (PRICAI, pp. 632-646). Springer, Cham (Computer science conference proceedings; authors are in alphabetical order). [Springer]

YouTube Lectures in Hebrew:

2010 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1hVmM2Gw-o

2012 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKjyh1lboCE 

2016 - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW6KNQoisKdvXI1OeajDRA25AnpbhdbBQ

2018 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTLbBb9FOnI

Answering Challenging Knowledge Questions:

Ackerman, R., & Goldsmith, M. (2008). Control over grain size in memory reporting - with and without satisficing knowledge. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 34, 1224-1245. [Self-made PDF

Bernstein, D., Aßfalg A., Kumar, R, & Ackerman, R. (2016). Looking backward and forward on hindsight bias. In J. Dunlosky & U. Tauber (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Metamemory (pp. 289-304). Oxford University Press. [Self-made PDF]

Sidi, Y., Ackerman, R., & Erez, A. (2018). Feeling happy and (over)confident: The role of positive affect in metacognitive processes. Cognition & Emotion, 32(4), 876-884. [Self-made PDF] [Journal's web site]

Meta-Memory:

Koriat, A., Ackerman, R., Lockl, K., & Schneider, W. (2009). The easily learned, easily-remembered heuristic in children.Cognitive Development, 24, 169-182. [Journal's website]

Koriat, A., Ackerman, R., Lockl, K., & Schneider, W. (2009). The memorizing effort heuristic in judgments of learning: A developmental perspective. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 102, 265-279. [Journal's website

Koriat, A., & Ackerman, R. (2010). Choice latency as a cue for children's subjective confidence in the correctness of their answers. Developmental Science, 13, 441-453. [Self-made PDF]

Ackerman, R., & Koriat, A. (2011). Response latency as a predictor of the accuracy of children's reports. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 17(4), 406-417. [Self-made PDF]

Koriat, A., & Ackerman, R. (2010). Metacognition and Mindreading: Judgments of learning for Self and Other during self-paced Study.  Consciousness and Cognition, 19, 251-264. [Journal's website]

Koriat, A., Ackerman, R., Adiv, S., Lockl, K., & Schneider, W. (2014). The effects of goal-driven and data-driven regulation on metacognitive monitoring during learning: A developmental perspective. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143(1), 386-403.  [Self-made PDF][Journal's web site]

Koriat, A., Nussinson, R., & Ackerman, R. (2014).  Judgments of learning depend on how learners interpret study effort. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 6, 1624-1637. [Self-made PDF][Journal's website]

Undorf, M., & Ackerman, R. (2017). The puzzle of study time allocation for the most challenging items. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 24(6), 2003-2011.[Self-made PDF] [Journal's website]

Meta-Comprehension:

Ackerman, R., & Goldsmith, M. (2011). see above under HCI.

Ackerman, R., & Lauterman, T. (2012). see above under HCI.

Ackerman, R., Leiser, D., & Shpigelman, M. (2013). Is comprehension of problem solutions resistant against misleading heuristic cues? Acta Psychologica, 143(1), 105–112.  [Self-made PDF] [Journal's website]

Lauterman, T., & Ackerman, R. (2014).  see above under HCI.

Ackerman, R., & Leiser, D. (2014).  The effect of concrete supplements on metacognitive regulation during learning and open-book test taking. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 84(2), 329–348. [Self-made PDF] [Journal's website

Miscellaneous:

2013  In-Sight Web Journal. Interview by Scott Jacobson.

Teaching

Human Factors Engineering

Metacognition

Research

Dr. Ackerman studies the cognitive processes of learning, question answering, and problem solving. Her studies are based on the metacognitive approach, by which subjective assessment of knowledge guides the activities taken by learners for achieving their goals. Understanding the factors that affect the reliability of metacognitive monitoring and the cases that are particularly prone to biases offers a foundation for developing effective learning environments and study techniques.

The difference in mental effort regulation between learning from screen and from paper.
Text design factors that may misguide the subjective assessment of knowledge.
Metacognitive factors that affect the way people formulate their answers to knowledge questions and solve logical problems.

Students

Current graduate students:

Tirza Lauterman - Email

Ilan Torgovitsky - Email

Liron Berko - Email

Roee Shraga - Email

Graduated:

Yael Ophir, Hagar Zalmanov, Fira Bazov, Daniela Soibelman, Fareda Nassar, Iris Livneh, Maya Shpigelman, Racheli Nave, Tirza Lauterman, Yael Beller, Yaniv Mantel, Yael Sidi, Adi Soria

Contact Info

Room 506 Bloomfield Building
+972-4-829-4438